Magic Breakfast

Peter Cruddas Foundation helps Magic Breakfast schools go bananas for SATs week!

Magic Breakfast is currently the only children's charity physically delivering free food to primary schools, as well as parent education and Headteacher food coaching.

The charity has ambitious growth plans, aiming to provide breakfast for 10,000 school children every day across 250 breakfast clubs in the UK by the end of 2010. This equates to 2 million breakfasts a year, up from the current level of 300,000.

The Peter Cruddas Foundation gives priority to programmes designed to help disadvantaged and disengaged young people to pursue their education (including vocational) and more generally develop their potential whether through sport or recreation, voluntary programmes or otherwise.

According to a recent Joseph Rowntree report, 2.3m children in the UK will still be living in poverty by 2010 and, for one in everyfour children, the only hot meal they receive is at school. A healthy breakfast is key to a child's development and Magic Breakfast aims to ensure that no child starts the school day too hungry to learn.Magic Breakfast is aiming to grow to meet the urgent need expressed by primary schools. In London 52% of children live in income poverty.

Magic Breakfast is currently the only children's charity physically delivering free food to primary schools, as well as parent education and Headteacher food coaching.

The charity has ambitious growth plans, aiming to provide breakfast for 10,000 school children every day across 250 breakfast clubs in the UK by the end of 2010. This equates to 2 million breakfasts a year, up from the current level of 300,000.

Carmel McConnell, Founder and CEO of Magic Breakfast, said:

"We are delighted with this practical, generous support from the Peter Cruddas Foundation. The SATs exams place additional strain on our partner schools, where many children arrive at school under nourished. By giving each Year 6 child a banana, the Foundation has chosen one of the simplest ways to make an immediate and dramatic difference. Breakfast clubs in schools have been a huge success, giving pupils a healthy start to the day which improves their concentration and ability to learn.

Magic Breakfast was started by Carmel McConnell. In 2000, while researching her book, "Change Activist", she became aware of the issues surrounding child poverty. As a result, in 2001, she started delivering breakfasts to six schools in Hackney. Magic Breakfast now delivers breakfast to 40 schools across London and Yorkshire. This it is hoped will increase to 250 schools by 2010.

The charity won Guardian charity of the Year in 2005, and Carmel McConnell was named Social Entrepreneur of the Year in 2008 (New Statesman/Edge)

According to the official government classification, any household with children where the parents have an income of less than 60% of British median income is classified as "in poverty". Currently, for a family with two children, this stands at 283.20 a week, after housing has been paid for.

According to government figures, half of the pupils below the poverty line get no free school meal because the income threshold to qualify for free meals is lower than the current level used to define poverty.

Magic Breakfast is committed to the long-term sustainability of breakfast clubs and is looking at innovative ways to help schools fund the breakfast clubs themselves. It costs Magic Breakfast 2,000 to support a breakfast club for a whole year.

For further information visit www.magicbreakfast.com

arrow
Magic Breakfast